How Do I Properly Store My Cheeses at Home?

Cheesemonger-Dan-Black-with-Bathed-in-Victory

You’ve talked to your Di Bruno Bros. monger, or read some irresistible descriptions on our website, and have just invested in a delicious selection of artisanal cheeses. Now that you’ve got them home—check out our handy guide below for the best ways to store them!

How do I properly store my cheeses at home?

General Guidelines:

If you purchased your cheese cut-to-order from one of our mongers, keep the cheese wrapped in its Di Bruno Bros. paper wrapping (or plastic deli container). If the paper starts looking a bit worse for wear, replace it with wax paper or freezer paper. Cheeses need to breathe a little, and wrapping it in plastic cling wrap will speed unwanted mold growth!

If your cheese is vacuum-sealed, and you plan on storing it for a while, leave it in the package. If you plan to eat it soon, take it out of the plastic wrapper and store it wrapped in waxed paper.

We recommend refrigerating your cheese to extend its longevity—just make sure the cheeses don’t dry out, and are kept separate from open containers of food. (Odors can transfer and will affect the cheese’s flavor.) A vegetable drawer, separate from and more moist than other parts of a fridge, is ideal.

 

Quick Guide to Storing Different Cheese Styles:

If you’re wondering how to store specific cheese types, or how to tell if they’re still good, take a look at this handy guide below:

1. Fresh Cheese: eg. Chèvre, Ricotta, Fromage Blanc, Mascarpone

  • Best stored: in a closed container (e.g. Tupperware, deli cup, etc)
  • Will usually stay good for: 1 week or so
  • Signs that they’ve spoiled include: mold growth (red, blue, green, etc.) and an unpleasant soured smell. Please discard!

2. Bloomy Rind: eg. Brie, Camembert, Delice de Bourgogne

  • Best stored: in a closed container, especially if ripe and runny! (e.g. a wooden box if it came in one, tupperware or deli container)
  • Will usually stay good for: up to 2 weeks
  • Signs that they’re past prime include: dried and hard rind; brown or red discoloration; an overwhelming smell and taste of ammonia.

3. Soft-ripened Washed Rind: eg. Grayson, Taleggio, Petit Vaccarinus

  • Best stored: in a closed container if ripe and runny! (e.g. a wooden box if it came in one, tupperware or deli container) If it’s relatively stable, wrapping in wax paper or freezer paper will be fine.
  • Will usually stay good for: up to 2 weeks
  • Signs that they’re past prime include: dried, cracked rind; brown or red discoloration; unpleasant stinky aroma (as opposed to a pleasant one).

4. Hard: Gruyere, Pleasant Ridge Reserve, Parmigiano-Reggiano

  • Best stored: wrapped in waxed or freezer paper.
  • Will usually stay good for: 3 to 4 weeks.
  • Signs that they’ve spoiled include: trick question! If a hard aged cheese starts growing mold, simply cut or scrape off the moldy parts and enjoy the rest. (More on this in our “Does cheese go bad?” post.)

5. Blue: eg. Stilton, Pt. Reyes Blue, Gorgonzola

  • Best stored: wrapped in wax or freezer paper, then in foil. Keep it separate from milder, younger cheeses if possible! Blue mold is pervasive and contagious.
  • Will usually stay good for: 2 to 3 weeks
  • Signs that they’ve spoiled include: runny texture; brown discoloration; an overwhelming smell and taste of ammonia.

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